Iron Deficiency Anemia Treatment

Iron Deficiency Anemia Treatment

 

If you suffer from anemia, it is imperative that you find the right iron deficiency anemia treatment. Treating it at the earliest will make a huge difference.

According to Hematology.org, you should watch  the symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia are related to decreased oxygen delivery to the entire body and may include:

 

  • Being pale or having yellow “sallow” skin
  • Unexplained fatigue or lack of energy
  • Shortness of breath or chest pain, especially with activity
  • Unexplained generalized weakness
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Pounding or “whooshing” in the ears
  • Headache, especially with activity
  • Craving for ice or clay – “picophagia”
  • Sore or smooth tongue
  • Brittle nails or hair loss

 

Source: Hematology.org

 

Try taking note of the treatments for iron deficiency anemia below. These were provided by

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. It said that you should try the following:

 

Dietary Changes and Supplements

 

Iron

 

You may need iron supplements to build up your iron levels as quickly as possible. Iron supplements can correct low iron levels within months. Supplements come in pill form or in drops for children.

 

Large amounts of iron can be harmful, so take iron supplements only as your doctor prescribes. Keep iron supplements out of reach from children. This will prevent them from taking an overdose of iron.

 

Iron supplements can cause side effects, such as dark stools, stomach irritation, and heartburn. Iron also can cause constipation, so your doctor may suggest that you use a stool softener.

 

Your doctor may advise you to eat more foods that are rich in iron. The best source of iron is red meat, especially beef and liver. Chicken, turkey, pork, fish, and shellfish also are good sources of iron.

 

The body tends to absorb iron from meat better than iron from nonmeat foods. However, some nonmeat foods also can help you raise your iron levels. Examples of nonmeat foods that are good sources of iron include:

 

Iron-fortified breads and cereals

Peas; lentils; white, red, and baked beans; soybeans; and chickpeas

Tofu

Dried fruits, such as prunes, raisins, and apricots

Spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables

Prune juice

 

The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how much iron the items contain. The amount is given as a percentage of the total amount of iron you need every day.

Vitamin C

 

Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron. Good sources of vitamin C are vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus fruits include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, and similar fruits. Fresh and frozen fruits, vegetables, and juices usually have more vitamin C than canned ones.

 

If you’re taking medicines, ask your doctor or pharmacist whether you can eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice. Grapefruit can affect the strength of a few medicines and how well they work.

 

Other fruits rich in vitamin C include kiwi fruit, strawberries, and cantaloupes.

 

Vegetables rich in vitamin C include broccoli, peppers, Brussels sprouts, tomatoes, cabbage, potatoes, and leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach.

 

Source: National Heart Lung and Blood Institute

 

Make sure that you initially determine the type of anemia that you are suffering from. That way, your doctor may provide you with the proper diagnosis and treatment.

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